The Wonderment of Gratitude

the-wonderment-of-gratitude

The Wonderment of Gratitude

Our connection to Spirit lies within the embedded human polarity that dominates our consciousness. It is through Spirit that we are connected with the universe and one another. Being in the moment and experiencing oneself is called “presence.”

“Spirtuality is caught, not taught.”
Pravrajika Vrajaprana, Vedanta:  A Simple Introduction

Presence is the ultimate victory of a Spirit Warrior to be fully present in Spirit and committed to deliver one’s mission through connecting with another’s Spirit.

The consciousness of Spirit shows up during moments of Gratitude. While the predominate portion of our daily life is concentrated on distractions or even with on-task events, we are still being guided by Spirit. The sharing of “thankfulness” that we associate with being “grateful” is different from the Spiritual source of gratitude. Being thankful directly to our Spirit source is the beginning of sharing gratitude. Thankfulness emanates from our devotion to thanking our “maker” (God) for the gifts that we receive in this lifetime.

We typically give thanks for the rewarding or positive events in our lives. Yet, every day, we are exposed to momentary defeats. Events more often do not go our way. Negative Reinforcement, the reward of avoiding a negative consequence, can seem more apparent than Positive Reinforcement, getting positive feedback.

By taking a more “open” experience toward results, there is an opportunity for “singular gratitude.” Examples…what just came out of my mouth actually made sense – “I just remembered where I left my…,” “The traffic was much clearer than I expected,” “I could have reacted but didn’t.” etc. The world around us can be viewed as choosing to cooperate or not.  Or we can find ourselves being frequently defensive and feeling confounded.  It has been researched that 80% of our day can be registered as dealing with negativity.  The task is how to convert going into a negative framework to waiting-it-out for some positive outcome. Example, “I may wander around looking for my cell phone, and then it just pops up.”

So being singularly On-Gratitude can offer an opportunity to give thanks for the greatest or the most miniscule of results. “Right NOW in this moment, I am grateful for…”.  Answer please!  Offering “singular” gratitude helps us “stay in the moment” so we can experience Presence and in a way, stay glued to Spirit.

Now conversely, if you operate on a perfectionist plane say for doing the “10X” model* that gives you 10Xs the effort that you might typically give to empower yourself to be genuinely successful. It is still important to “chunk it down” and set for the immediate singular possibilities of reward. We live in a capitalistic society whereby we place value on achieving money and goods. Achieving our goals can be paramount. Yet, it is easy to get lost in the maze of “futurizing” our goals and not being grateful for the present moment.

Trusting Spirit probably has more to do with instituting personal Trust. This is about trusting that events, more than optimism, will have some redeeming value. Success will come to us if we can strive to “live in the present moment.” The potential positive outcome is “at hand.” The challenge is “Can we trust Spirit to lead us through the maze?”

From David Richo, The Power of Grace … “Grace is a transcendence-produced force; effort is an accomplishment-producing force.”  It is similar to breathing with the inhale on Effort and the exhale on Grace.  Effort and Grace are an energizing and uniting force. It is where transcendence and transformation come together. Both are always dependent on the other.

*The 10X Rule by Grant Cardone. (Interestingly, a New Warrior graduate)

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